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12/04 2017

NASCAR HALL OF FAMER JACK INGRAM SERIOUSLY INJURED IN CAR CRASH

Jack Ingram

 

 

Jack Ingram was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2014.PHOTO BY GETTY IMAGES FOR NASCAR 

Ingram was first champion of the modern-era NASCAR Xfinity Series in 1982

BY:  AUTOWEEK

NASCAR Hall of Famer Jack Ingram was seriously injured in a car crash near his hometown of Asheville, North Carolina, on Sunday.

Ingram’s family said Monday morning that the 2014 NASCAR Hall of Fame inductee was in the intensive care unit.

Ingram, 80, was the first champion of the modern-era NASCAR Xfinity Series, having won the championship in 1982 and 1985.

“We are currently by his side, managing his care with his clinicians and will decide next steps,” a family statement read. “We remain hopeful and positive, and appreciate all thoughts and prayers. We will provide updates as information becomes available.”

According to the Asheville Police Department, Ingram was driving a 2002 Chevrolet when it was struck in the driver’s side door by a 1999 Ford pickup. Ingram was transported to nearby Mission Hospital in Asheville with a collapsed lung, five broken ribs and a puncture wound on his left side. Once in ICU, it was determined that he had also suffered a spleen injury.

NASCAR.com is reporting that the accident occurred within a tenth of a mile from the former site of Asheville Motor Speedway, where Ingram was a local legend. The 1/3-mile paved oval stopped hosting weekly racing after the 1999 season.

 

Some statistics might be incomplete, but Ingram is thought to have started upwards of 1,200 NASCAR races during the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and ’90s. He won 31 races in what is now known as the Xfinity Series, but is generally credited with winning approximately 300 other races when the tour was known as Late Model Sportsman. He’s said to have won at 28 different venues in eight states and claimed 12 track championships in three states.

His second Late Model Sportsman championship season of 1973 included this unimaginable weekend: consecutive short-track starts at Columbia, South Carolina; Beltsville, Maryland; Coeburn, Virginia; and Maryville, Tennessee, on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, another race in Minnnesota on Monday afternoon and another race at Nashville on Monday night. He won the first four, was fifth in Minnesota and fourth in Nashville.

Before his enshrinement into the NASCAR Hall of Fame three years ago, he went into the National Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1997 and the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 2007.